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Vapor Intrusion - Environmental Health: Minnesota Dept. of Health

Vapor Intrusion

Image of how vapors can move through a building.Chemicals that have been spilled or dumped on the ground can pollute soil and groundwater. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are chemicals that easily evaporate into air.

VOCs that evaporate from polluted soil and groundwater can create chemical vapors underground. If these vapors move and come in contact with a building, they may enter through cracks in the foundation, around pipes, or through a drain system. The VOCs can then contaminate indoor air. This process - when pollution moves from air spaces in soil to indoor air - is called vapor intrusion.

For more information about vapor intrusion investigations, see the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency Vapor Intrusion webpage.

Information Sheets

Information used in vapor intrusion site investigations are listed below.

What is Vapor Intrusion? (Residential Buildings)

Information sheet with general information about vapor intrusion in residential buildings

What is Vapor Intrusion? (Commercial Buildings)

Information sheet with general information about vapor intrusion in commercial buildings

Your Health and Vapor Intrusion (Residential Buildings)

Information sheet about who MDH considers more sensitive to vapor intrusion health risks

Your Health and Vapor Intrusion (Commercial Buildings)

Information sheet about who MDH considers more sensitive to vapor intrusion health risks (in the workplace)

Information Sheet about TCE in Air - Trichloroethylene (TCE) in Air (PDF)

MDH is especially concerned about women in their first trimester when the contaminant trichloroethylene (TCE) is present.

Information Sheet about PCE in Air - Tetrachloroethylene (PCE, perc) in Air (PDF)

Information about health risks, what to know before talking to your patients, health care provider recommendations, and resources.

Trichloroethylene (TCE) and Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) Exposures and Vapor Intrusion (PDF)

For health-related questions regarding vapor intrusion or contaminated sites, please contact us.

Prepared in cooperation with the US Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry.

Updated Thursday, 20-Oct-2022 10:42:14 CDT